The latest developments in the US elections

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Latest on Election Day 2016 (all times EST):

Donald Trump elected president of the United States.

2:22 a.m.

Donald Trump has arrived at his election night headquarters after winning the state of Pennsylvania.

Trump's motorcade traveled from nearby Trump Tower to the midtown hotel where thousands of his supporters and hundreds of reporters are gathered.

Trump is expected to address the crowd.

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2:08 a.m.

Republicans have officially retained control of the U.S. Senate.

It comes as Missouri Republican Roy Blunt and Alaska's Lisa Murkowski won their two races in Tuesday's election.

Republicans have a 51-47 edge in the Senate. Two races remain outstanding: In Louisiana, the seat will head to a runoff election next month. And in New Hampshire, Democrat Maggie Hassan and Republican Kelly Ayotte were locked in a too-close-to-call race.

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12:02 a.m.

Donald Trump has won the battleground state of Iowa.

He was awarded the state's six Electoral College votes early Wednesday.

Trump now has 244 electoral votes. His Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton has 209.

Iowa had voted for a Republican only once since 1984 but polls remained tight throughout the campaign. Trump proved popular with the state's sizable evangelical population while Clinton and her allies campaigned frequently in its college towns.

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11:35 p.m.        

Democrat Elaine Marshall has won a sixth term as North Carolina's secretary of state.

Marshall had been challenged by Republican Michael LaPaglia of Durham.

Marshall has led the department for 20 years and was the first woman elected to a statewide office. The job's duties include enforcing ethics rules, overseeing legislative lobbyists and investigating securities fraud.

LaPaglia owns a consulting company that advises museums and historic sites.

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11:33 p.m.

Donald Trump has won Georgia.

The Republican nominee on Tuesday was awarded its 16 electoral votes.

Trump now has 232 electoral votes while his Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton has 209.

The Democrats had some hopes that changing demographics in Georgia could allow then to flip the reliably Republican state but their efforts fell short.

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11:25 p.m.

Republican Lt. Gov. Dan Forest has beaten Democratic challenger Linda Coleman.

The election was a rematch of 2012, when Forest narrowly topped Coleman by nearly 7,000 votes out of 4.4 million ballots cast.

Forest has become one of the state's most outspoken advocates for conservative social issues. He also has been a leader in defending a state law that requires transgender people to use restrooms in schools and state government buildings that correspond to the gender on their birth certificates.

Coleman had aligned herself with the Democratic Party's candidate for governor, Attorney General Roy Cooper, and argued the law was hurting the state's economy and its reputation.

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11:10 p.m.

Republican Donald Trump has won a key victory in the Southern battleground state of North Carolina, defeating Democrat Hillary Clinton in the state's presidential election.

Trump defeated Clinton on Tuesday in a general election that was widely seen as a referendum on several years of GOP control under Gov. Pat McCrory. It also was strongly influenced by a law limiting LGBT rights that was signed and defended by McCrory.

North Carolina's 15 electoral votes are considered crucial in the battle for the White House. The state has gone to a Democrat only once since Jimmy Carter's election in 1976, when Barack Obama narrowly won the state in 2008.

Trump and running mate Mike Pence frequently visited North Carolina in recent months, targeting rural areas where they enjoyed strong support.

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10:50 p.m.

Donald Trump has won the key battleground state of Florida.

Trump on Tuesday was awarded 29 electoral votes.

He now has 197 electoral votes. His Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton has 131.

Both candidates have spent an extraordinary amount of time in Florida, one of the most important prizes on the map. Trump calls Florida his "second home" and his campaign acknowledged that a win there is vital to his White House hopes.

Barack Obama captured the Sunshine State in both 2008 and 2012.

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10:43 p.m.

Hillary Clinton has won Colorado.

The Democratic nominee captured its nine electoral votes Tuesday. She now has 131 total electoral votes while her Republican opponent Donald Trump has 168.

Colorado has become an attainable state for Democrats in recent years thanks to shifting demographics.

Clinton tried to woo a surge in Latino voters and the state's college-educated whites while Trump repeatedly made pitches to Colorado's large military population and swaths of rural voters.

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10:40 p.m.

Hillary Clinton has won Virginia.

The Democratic nominee has captured its 13 electoral votes.

Virginia was reliably Republican for decades until Barack Obama won it twice, thanks in part to huge turnout from Washington, D.C.'s suburbs. Clinton's running mate, Tim Kaine, is a senator from Virginia, though Trump made a late push in the state.

The victory gives her 122 electoral votes. Her Republican opponent Donald Trump has 168.

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9:26 p.m.

Hillary Clinton has won Connecticut.

The Democratic nominee on Tuesday was awarded Connecticut's seven electoral votes.

The result was not a surprise, as Connecticut was considered a safely Democratic state.

Clinton now has 104 electoral votes. Her Republican opponent Donald Trump has 129.

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9:15 p.m.

Republican Eric Holcomb has won the governor's race in Indiana and Democrat Jim Justice has won the governor's race in West Virginia.

Holcomb defeated Democrat John Gregg in Tuesday's election and will succeed Gov. Mike Pence. Pence is presidential candidate Donald Trump's vice presidential running mate.

In West Virginia, Gregg defeated state Senate President Bill Cole.

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9:08 p.m.

Republican Donald Trump has won Arkansas and its six electoral votes.

That brings his electoral vote total in Tuesday's election to 129. Democrat Hillary Clinton has 97.

It takes 270 votes to win the presidency.

The result was expected. Earlier polling showed Trump leading Clinton by double digits in the state where she served as first lady for 12 years while her husband was the governor.

The once reliably blue state has turned red in recent years. Republicans now control all of Arkansas' statewide and federal offices, as well as a majority of seats in both chambers of the state legislature.

Arkansas has backed the Republican candidate for the White House in every election since 1980 -- except for years when Bill Clinton was running for president.

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9:05 p.m.

Hopeful Hillary Clinton supporters have gathered on a Brooklyn street corner they expect to be prophetic: The intersection of President and Clinton Streets.

Photos and video posted on social media Tuesday show hundreds of people gathered for a block party where the streets cross.

Organizers have set up a large screen to stream election coverage. A food truck is dispensing tacos to the crowd.

The street signs in the intersection have been an attraction all Election Day for Clinton boosters snapping selfies.

It is just under a mile from Clinton's national campaign headquarters in Brooklyn.

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9:05 p.m.

Polls in Colorado will close at 7 p.m. MST after a judge denied the Colorado Democratic Party's request to extend voting by two hours.

The head of the Colorado Democratic Party argued that voting hours should be extended to account for a 29-minute computer glitch Tuesday afternoon. The statewide glitch affected same-day voter registration and caused some voters to have to cast provisional ballots.

The Secretary of State opposed the extended hours. Deputy Secretary of State Stephanie Staiert says no one was prevented from voting because of the glitch.

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9:01 p.m.

Republican Doug Burgum has won the North Dakota governor's race.

The Fargo businessman and onetime Microsoft Corp. executive was considered a shoo-in in Tuesday's election. He defeated Democrat Marvin Nelson.

The matchup focused on qualifications to lead the socially conservative state amid declining oil and crop revenues.

Burgum has stuck to themes of budget discipline, job creation and opposition to tax increases. Nelson has been highly critical of deep cuts to government agencies and a massive raid on the oil-rich state's savings to make up for a more than $1 billion budget shortfall due to a drop in oil drilling and depressed crude prices

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9 p.m.

Donald Trump has won Texas, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming, Kansas and Nebraska while Hillary Clinton has won New York and Illinois.

Trump also on Tuesday won two of Nebraska's congressional districts. In the state that awards by congressional district, one remains too close to call.

Trump was awarded Texas' 38 electoral votes, the second-largest prize on the map. He also won six from Kansas, four from his victories in Nebraska and three apiece from Wyoming, North Dakota and South Dakota.

Clinton was awarded 20 from Illinois and 29 from New York, the state both candidates call home. Trump had declared he would try to win New York but never mounted a serious effort there.

The Republican nominee now has 123 electoral votes. Clinton has 97.

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8:13 p.m.

Donald Trump has won Tennessee and its 11 electoral votes.

Tuesday's vote is the fifth presidential contest in a row in which the state voted for the Republican candidate. That includes the 2000 election, when native son Al Gore lost the state to Republican George W. Bush.

It takes 270 votes to win the presidency.

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8:10 p.m.

An election watchdog says some voters were denied provisional ballots at several polling stations in Atlanta.

Georgia Election Protection coalition spokesman Harold Franklin says poll mangers refused to provide provisional ballots to voters Tuesday. He says the group received reports that voters were given no reason for being refused.

Franklin claims voters who are eligible or entitled to a provisional ballot were denied. He did not know the number of voters who were refused, but said the bulk occurred in Fulton County.

Franklin says he spoke with Fulton County election officials, who he said told polling managers to provide voters with ballots. The Fulton County elections office did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Election Protection is organized by the Lawyers Committee for Civils Rights Under Law.

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8:09 p.m.

Donald Trump has won South Carolina.

The Republican nominee was awarded the state's nine electoral votes, giving him 40 for the night. The result was expected as the state has long been a Republican stronghold.

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8:08 p.m.

Democratic Rep. John Carney has won the Delaware governor's race eight years after losing his first bid to become the state's chief executive.

Carney easily defeated Republican state Sen. Colin Bonini of Dover in Tuesday's gubernatorial contest. The victory was driven by voter registration numbers that heavily favor Democrats. 

Carney has said job creation and economic development will be among his top priorities, along with improving Delaware's public education system.

He also has acknowledged that the next governor faces significant challenges given troubling revenue expectations and escalating costs for Medicaid and state employee health care.

Carney will succeed Jack Markell, who defeated Carney in the 2008 Democratic gubernatorial primary.

Carney previously served as lieutenant governor.

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7:35 p.m.

The North Carolina Board of Elections has agreed to extend voting in eight precincts in Durham County, where Democrats have a 4-to-1 registration advantage over Republicans.

The state board voted 3-2 Tuesday night to extend voting by an hour in two precincts most affected by a computer glitch. The problem forced poll workers to check for registered voters on paper printouts, causing long lines at some locations.

The board says six more precincts can stay open for a shorter time.

The NAACP's North Carolina chapter had asked for the eight precincts to stay open for 90 extra minutes. Hillary Clinton's campaign also supported keeping the polls open later in Durham.

Two groups filed lawsuits seeking to keep the polls open, but a state superior court judge declined to intervene.

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7:32 p.m.

North Carolina got more attention than usual this election, and exit polls show why.

Exit polls conducted by Edison Research for national media outlets suggest a tight finish between Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump for the state's 15 electoral votes.

The polls suggest a majority of men back Trump, while Clinton won a majority among women -- with the margins essentially even. The polls suggest women made up slightly more of the electorate.

About four out of five nonwhite voters backed Clinton, while about six out of 10 white voters supported Trump. But the exit polls don't offer definitive information about actual turnout among those groups, with the estimates again pointing to a close finish.


 

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