Multiple law enforcement agencies train for crucial investigation

- "We are seeing our detectives come together, working with each other, coordinating through the command center," CMPD Deputy Chief Doug Gallant said.

More than a dozen federal, state and local law enforcement agencies came together for crucial training on Wednesday. This is training that can help streamline communication between all agencies in the aftermath of any critical event similar to that of the Pulse Nightclub shooting or the Boston bombing,

"Unless you are used to working with these every day, which none of us are, because we are going to the first response and additional resources follow. We have to be prepared for that and this gives us that opportunity," Deputy Chief Gallant said.

The FBI and CMPD created scenarios with rooms filled with bullet casings and other items detectives have to process during a crime scene investigation.

Also, they brought in people to role play as potential witnesses or even suspects so detectives could ask them questions about the mock investigation.

This - all to help find snags in the process for when a real life situation occurs - making sure all federal, state and local agencies are on the same page.

“Each time, we've noticed better ways to do things. So for example, in Boston, we came up with a central evidence processing system that both the Boston Police Department and the FBI could utilize. So there was one central choke point that we were getting 'intel' from," Charlotte FBI Special Agent in charge John Wydra said.

"That's why it's so important to have everyone working together, in one building or in one trailer in this case, to be able to talk, to be able to communicate," Deputy Chief Gallant said.

"Today is critical and it's already showing value. We already have lessons learned and we are going to have an after-action that will lay out what each agency’s capabilities are and who does it betters," Wydra said.

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