Samsung analyzing Charlotte teen's phone after it burned, melted

- Asia Shirley, 14, new white smartphone is now charred black.

"I heard a sound it was like shhh," said Asia, who woke up in the middle of the night to a smoke alarm. "And then I started smelling smoke."

On Monday, Fox 46 introduced you to the Charlotte teen and her mom. Both are looking for answers after Asia's Samsung Galaxy J7 Prime started melting in the middle of the night. The phone was plugged into the wall at the time, charging on a Samsung charger, according to Asia.

"I don't know," said her mother, Janice Shirley. "It's just crazy how a phone could just do that."

Shirley says she bought the phone new from the MetroPCS on Freedom Drive in Charlotte in August. The store manager says they do not sell refurbished phones.

She says the phone had its original battery and charger when it began smoking.

The Galaxy J7 is not on any recall list. This latest complaint comes a year after Samsung was forced to recall millions of Galaxy Note 7's because its lithium ion batteries could overheat and catch fire. 

Since Fox 46's story, Samsung sent a representative to collect what's left of the phone. Samsung officials say they will analyze it to determine what went wrong but could not say how long that will take. 

Fox 46 showed photos of the phone to a certified fire investigator who said it is clear the fire, or intense heat, "originated from inside the phone" but noted it's unclear if they battery was the direct cause. 

We found at least three other similar cases involving the J7 catching fire, including a report last month where the phone caught fire mid-air on a Jet Airways flight in India. 

"Until Samsung is able to thoroughly examine any unit it is impossible to determine the cause of any incident," a Samsung spokesperson said in a statement. "Mobile phones are complex products and there are many factors that could contribute to their malfunction."

In the meantime, company officials say they will reimburse Shirley for the cost of the phone.

"I want to thank Fox News and Matt for reaching out," said Shirley, "and helping me and my daughter with the situation."

Earlier this year Samsung announced an eight point battery safety check during the manufacturing process that involves putting the batteries through extreme heat along with X-ray inspection. 

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