Six months after Hurricane Maria, Puerto Rico still receiving donations from North Carolina

- After six months, many in Puerto Rico are finally seeing the light.

"I’m so happy," Naguabo, Puerto Rico Resident Jose Rodriguez.

Power is slowly being restore but still 100,000 Puerto Ricans are without it. Something Carl A. Furr Elementary Teacher Maggie Covington made sure her second graders are aware of.

"They had a hurricane and it was really, really bad," Second Grader Lily Gronko said

"My goal as a teacher is not just to make better learners but it's to make better people," Covington said.

After speaking with her colleague, Kindergarten teacher Karen Hernandez, who has family in Puerto Rico, Covington wanted to help with her monthly “Random Act of Kindness” activity she does with the classroom. Making February's focused on sending donations to Puerto Rico.

"They’re just having a tough time getting help down there, so I told her about my class doing a “Random Act of Kindness” and that somehow I wanted to partner with her and figure out a way to help the people in Puerto Rico," Covington said. 

Both were able to connect with a school that was living on scraps in Humacao, Puerto Rico. Humacao is one of the hardest his municipalities on southern part of the island, where category 4 Hurricane Maria entered in September of last year.

With help from parents, students and other teachers they were able to gather boxes and boxes of supplies.

"Like school supplies, like notebooks, pencils, crayons stuff like that," Gronko said.

With Wells Fargo paying for the shipping, they were able to send the donations down quickly. 

"I bet the kid that's going to get them are going to be happy with the school supplies that they get too," Second Grader Bryson Smith said. 

Covington says her hopes is for her students to continue to do these “Random Acts of Kindness” outside of class.

"They know that the reason they do those random acts of kindness is not for a reward for themselves, it's because they care about other people," Covington said.

"It feels good in your heart to be helping people all the time," Gronko said.

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