'I appreciate everything a lot more.' Brain surgery relieves seizures for Charlotte man

Scott Anderson is counting his blessings this holiday season. For years he’s lived with seizures following a motorcycle crash in 2012 that changed his life.

Anderson remembers that day. He was leaving the gym when a car pulled out in front of him. Anderson slammed into the passenger side of the car and was thrown off of his motorcycle. The 26-year-old broke several bones and suffered a traumatic brain injury. As a result, his brain injury triggered seizures.

He would have them daily. With the help of medication, Anderson experienced seizures less often but they were still part of his life.

For years, Scott Anderson lived with seizures following a motorcycle crash in 2012 that changed his life.

“It never really seemed to work. I was still having them to the point I was uncomfortable,” Anderson said. He credits his mom for pushing, in a good way, to find new doctors and second opinions.

Anderson moved to Charlotte from Ohio in 2017 and met Dr. Dan Dimitriu, an epileptologist with Atrium Health’s Neuroscience Institute.

“I’d have about one seizure a month but he said that was unacceptable,” explained Anderson.

“There’s a possibility we can remove that spot and treat the seizures that way,” Dr. Dimitriu said. A seizure, in the broadest sense, is a disruption in the electrical activity in the brain explained Dimitriu. Surgery was recommended for Anderson.

“You hear brain surgery and you’re terrified,” explained Anderson. While he was scared he says he felt like he was in good hands and was ready to try anything.

Scott Anderson moved to Charlotte from Ohio in 2017 and met Dr. Dan Dimitriu, an epileptologist with Atrium Health’s Neuroscience Institute. Surgery was recommended for his seizures.

Anderson, who is almost 34, spent several weeks at Carolinas Medical Center in the Epilepsy Monitoring Unit under a watchful eye. Since the surgery, Anderson has been seizure-free.

“We are encouraged that at the very least the surgery will improve his outcome long-term,” explained Dimitriu who is pleased with Anderson's progress.

Anderson shared some more good news with his doctor.

“I’m newly engaged,” he said with a big smile.

Last month Anderson proposed to his girlfriend who never left his hospital bedside.

“The lesson here is if you continue to have seizures you should, at the very least, try to seek more advanced treatment,” said Dimitriu.

Anderson’s scars show what he’s been through. They will always be a reminder, and while it will always be in the back of his mind he is a very thankful man.

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“I couldn’t ask for a better family and fiancé. My mother and father were able to be with me the entire way,” Anderson said. “I appreciate everything a lot more in life.”

The next step is to slowly reduce the amount of medication Anderson takes.

November is epilepsy awareness month.