National Drug Take-Back program now accepting vaping devices

This weekend's National Drug Take-Back day will now accept vaping devices.

Federal authorities say e-cigarettes have become a threat to public health, and it's pushing local organizations to take action.

The event is held a couple of times a year and allows people to drop off their prescription drugs in a safe place, and now, vaping devices have been added to the list.  

For the organizations handling those takebacks, they say it will mean more work and more money, but for the greater good."

Vaping has been a growing issue for months and one that has people giving up what was once seen as an alternative to smoking.

It's now considered a public health threat, one Safe Kids Charlotte-Mecklenburg has been seeing. 

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They oversee the drug takeback programs that happen across the area and they say they are ready for the new haul of vaping devices people could be handing over this weekend.

They found out just last week that e-cigarettes are part of the new things they're taking in.

"They're considered a poison and any drug we take in is considered a poison and so, the DEA has determined that it can be destroyed in a normal way, which is incinerated," said Janice Williams, who works with the program. 

E-cigarettes have largely been a booming business, but the rise in illnesses and deaths related to vaping have led to federal investigations, warnings and even a lawsuit from the state of North Carolina against eight e-cigarette companies.

Some companies have even pulled their devices off the shelves across the state. They say, given that, people are taking, or need to take, a second look.

"Parents should be taking into consideration that there are options and officials are warning them against such a device," Williams said. 

The Drug Take-Back Day will involve the devices, but not their batteries.  If you want to give them up, you'll have to take those batteries out because of an explosion hazard.