Teachers protest decision not to increase their pay

Teachers in Charlotte protested Wednesday because they’re not getting pay raises from the state of North Carolina.

Lawmakers failed to override Governor Roy Cooper’s veto of pay raises.

Teachers held a rally Wednesday afternoon in south Charlotte on Park Road at the North Carolina Educators Association building.

Teachers held signs demanding that lawmakers listen and support strong public schools.

The state pay raises for teachers averaged 3.9%. For a teacher making about $54,000 a year, they would've gotten more than $2,000 extra with the pay raise.

The governor originally vetoed the pay raises because he said they weren't enough, that teachers should get a bigger increase. And this week lawmakers did not have enough votes to override his veto.

“I think one impact you’ll see is that we will continue to lose teachers to neighboring states where pay and benefits are better, and we will continue to have problems attracting people to the profession, people who would’ve made great teachers, but will see that in North Carolina we have a lot of disrespect and lack of support for teachers from our legislature,” said Justin Parmenter, a CMS teacher at Waddell Academy.

It doesn't look like there will be any more discussion on teacher pay raises until April when lawmakers return to Raleigh.

The pay increase would have also been for teacher assistants and other school staff.