With more than 100 murders this year, Charlotte neighbors worry about where city is headed

The city of Charlotte has had more than 100 homicides this year, with four of them happening since Thanksgiving. 

The last one was in an east Charlotte neighborhood where some say they've lived for decades and never seen that type of violence.  Neighbors say they're not happy with the way things have changed over time. 

"I’ve been here for over 20 years and when I first moved here the area was real quiet but over time it has gotten to where I hear shots at night," Tim Clark said. 

Tire marks and charred grass are all that's left on Barrington Drive where a man was shot before the car he was in was then set on fire. The victim was identified as 49-year-old Perry Demetius Bostic Tuesday.

This homicide marks 103, bringing us to one of the highest murder rates since the city has been keeping record. 

"That is way too many. One is too many and the year is not even out yet," Clark said. 

City leaders are asking for an end to the violence and police have started initiatives to reduce the skyrocketing homicide rate. 

"We must change the path that we have taken this year. We must change that path,” Mayor Vi Lyles said. 

The shooting happed just before 7 p.m., the same time new and returning city leaders were being sworn in and weighing in on what needs to happen next. 

"In January, I will ask the city council to review the homicide cases that have occurred this year to determine the neighborhoods most impacted by violence in guns," said Mayor Lyles. 

Some say violence is expected within a city growing as fast as Charlotte. 

"When the city is building and growing this fast, crime also grows with it," said Clark.  

FOX 46 pulled the stats for Barrington Drive. The bright markers high light the crimes that have been reported over the last six months. Incidents range from robbery to aggravated assault. 

Clark says it's not homeowners in the area, but the people who are moving in and out. 

"I have good neighbors but that doesn’t control the people that come in and do what they do and keep moving,” Clark said.